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Annual Report 2012–2013


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Supporting the Delivery of Justice for all Canadians

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Message from the Chief Administrator

The Honourable Daniel GosselinI am pleased to present the annual report on the activities of the Courts Administration Service (CAS) for the year ended March 31, 2013.

This report highlights our accomplishments and the nature and extent of our engagement in supporting the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

This past year, we made important organizational changes to provide services which are more responsive and tailored to the needs of each court. We reinforced our governance structure, reallocated resources in direct support of judicial and registry services, and delivered new electronic work tools.

However, the financial pressures continued to impact the work of the organization in 2012-13. Notwithstanding these difficulties, we remained focused in our efforts to provide good judicial, registry and corporate services to the courts and their users. Our ongoing collaboration with the four courts was also critical as it helped us prioritize our initiatives and reallocate our resources to essential activities. As we move forward, we must continue to work with central agencies to identify viable long-term financial solutions.

I extend my thanks to all the employees who continued to deliver high standards of service and contributed to our successes during the past year. Through their tireless efforts, steadfast dedication and focus, we have been able to deliver professional and high quality services to the members of the courts, their users and the public.

I also take this opportunity to thank the Chief Justices, the Judges and the Prothonotaries for their ongoing collaboration and patience. I am truly grateful for their ongoing support, advice and commitment to our success.

Daniel Gosselin, FCPA, FCA
Chief Administrator

Our mission

Provide timely and accurate registry, judicial and corporate services to the four superior courts and to their clients in the most innovative and effective manner, while promoting a healthy workplace and encouraging employees’ ongoing contribution to service delivery excellence.

Our values

Transparency – We aim to provide timely and unfettered access to clear and accurate information.

Respect – We recognize that our employees are entitled to work in a harassment-free environment where everyone can freely express their opinions without fear of recrimination or reprisal.

Innovation – We encourage a work environment that fosters creativity and new ideas to improve our business practices and the quality of our services.

Wellness – We advocate attitudes and activities in the workplace which generate a sense of spirit and belonging, that have a potential to improve overall physical and mental health, and that facilitate, encourage and promote fun and a balanced work and personal life.

Excellence – We strive to be exemplary in everything we do.

Table of Contents

Message from the Chief Administrator

Overview

The Courts we Support

Committees Participation

The Year in Brief

Courts Statistics

Financial Highlights

Appendix I – Acronyms

Appendix II – Glossary

Appendix III – Contact Us

Who we are

612 employees

Supporting:

4 national superior courts of record

  • Federal Court of Appeal
  • Federal Court
  • Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada
  • Tax Court of Canada

80 members of the courts

  • 4 Chief Justices
  • 1 Associate Chief Justice
  • 60 Judges
  • 9 Supernumerary Judges
  • 6 Prothonotaries

44,426 proceedings were instituted or filed

456,666 recorded entries were made.

$65.6 millions in actual spending from Parliamentary authorities

Operating permanent offices in 10 cities across Canada

Part I Overview


Our Focus

We strive towards service excellence in the provision of judicial, registry and corporate services to the four national superior courts of record we serve


The Courts Administration Service (CAS) was established on July 2, 2003 by the Courts Administration Service Act, S.C. 2002, c.8. The role of CAS is to provide registry, judicial and corporate services to the four federal superior courts of record, thereby helping to maintain the independence of these courts from the government. The four courts served by CAS are the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.

The services provided by CAS enable the courts to function and members of the courts to hear and resolve cases in a fair, expeditious and efficient manner. They assist individuals, organizations and the Government of Canada in submitting disputes and other matters to the courts.

Mandate

Pursuant to section 2 of the Courts Administration Service Act (the Act), the Courts Administration Service is mandated to:

  • Facilitate coordination and cooperation among the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court and the Tax Court of Canada for the purpose of ensuring the effective and efficient provision of administrative services;
  • Enhance judicial independence by placing administrative services at arm’s length from the Government of Canada and by affirming the roles of chief justices and judges in the management of the courts; and
  • Enhance accountability for the use of public money in support of court administration while safeguarding the independence of the judiciary.

Judicial Independence

Judicial independence is a cornerstone of the Canadian judicial system. Under the Constitution, the judiciary is separate from, and independent of, the executive and legislative branches of the Government of Canada. Judicial independence is a guarantee that judges will make decisions free of influence and based solely on fact and law. It has three components: security of tenure, financial security and administrative independence.


We believe in spirited teamwork

We know that listening to the Courts, litigants and Canadians is key to improving our services


Role of the Chief Administrator

The Chief Administrator of CAS is the Chief Executive Officer of the organization and is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Justice.

Subsection 7(2) of the Courts Administration Service Act specifies that the Chief Administrator has all the powers necessary for:

  • Providing effective and efficient management and administration of court services, including court facilities, libraries, corporate services and staffing; and
  • Structuring registry operations and preparing budgets, in consultation with the Chief Justices of the four Courts, for the requirements of those Courts and the related needs of CAS.

Section 8 of the Courts Administration Service Act provides that the Chief Justices are responsible for the judicial functions of their Courts; this includes the power to determine the sittings of the Court, assign judges to sittings, determine the sitting schedules and places of sittings for judges and determine the total annual, monthly and weekly workload of judges. Moreover, officers, clerks and employees of CAS act at the direction of the respective Chief Justices in matters that are assigned by law to the judiciary.

Subsections 7(4) and 9(1) of the Courts Administration Service Act place two specific restrictions on the powers of the Chief Administrator:

  • The powers of the Chief Administrator do not extend to any matter assigned by law to the judiciary; and
  • A Chief Justice may issue binding directions in writing to the Chief Administrator with respect to any matter within the Chief Administrator’s authority.

This was designed to ensure the institutional independence of the four federal Courts from the other branches of the government, the executive and the legislative, while providing appropriate accountability for the funding provided by Parliament for the operation of the Courts.

Governance

Organizational Structure

In 2012-13, CAS continued to improve the efficiency of its services by tailoring them to the specific needs of each Court. Through a corporate reorganization, CAS finalized the governance structure that was established during the previous reporting period.

Courts Administrative Service

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The amalgamation of the Judicial Services and the Registry Services enhanced the level of administrative and legal support provided to members of the courts, and improved CAS’ management capacity and succession planning.

Judicial and Registry Services

The Judicial and Registry Services Branch provides the four Courts with appropriate and adequate support to enable them to execute their judicial functions effectively and efficiently.

Judicial Services support members of the four courts in discharging their judicial functions through executive legal officers, senior legal counsel, judicial administrators, law clerks, jurilinguists, judicial assistants, library personnel and court attendants. The services include legal advice and research, revision, linguistic and terminological advice, translation, media contacts, administrative support and liaison with bar associations across Canada.

Registry Services are delivered across the country on behalf of the four Courts. The registries process legal documents, provide information to litigants on court procedures, maintain court records, participate in court hearings as required by the judiciary, support and assist in the enforcement of court orders, and work closely with the Offices of the four Chief Justices to ensure that matters are heard and decisions are rendered in a timely manner. Registry Services are offered in every province and territory through a network of permanent offices, and agreements with provincial and territorial partners.

Corporate Services

The Corporate Services Branch supports the full range of corporate operations and functions by managing activities and resources which apply across the organization.

The Branch provides overall corporate leadership and infrastructure to integrate and deliver a variety of management frameworks and services in support of the operations, objectives, priorities and requirements of the four federal Courts and CAS. The Branch also provides key operational services which assist the four courts and their respective registries in carrying out their activities.

The services offered by the Branch are: Finance and Materiel Management; Human Resources; Information Management and Information Technology; Security, Facilities and Administrative Services; and Project Management and Business Analysis.


Transparency, consultation and collaboration with the courts are more Essential than ever In this climate of financial constraint


Senior Committee Structure

CAS’ governance is facilitated by a number of committees which help determine the requirements of each Court and make informed decisions on key issues.

Senior Committee Structure

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The CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee assists the Chief Administrator with respect to CAS’ priorities, risks, budget allocations, and other significant matters affecting the conduct of the courts. The Chief Justices Steering Committee is supported by three National Judges Committees (Security, IM/IT and Accommodations) and its membership includes representatives of each of the courts and CAS. These national committees promote collaboration on decision-making, support the prudent and efficient management of resources, and improve communications between the courts and CAS.

The Executive Committee (ExCom) is the organization’s most senior decision-making body. The Executive Committee is supported by the Senior Management Committee which plays an important role in all planning activities and also assists the decision-making process by reviewing operational and policy issues and making recommendations to ExCom.

CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee

The mandate of the CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee is to provide a forum to discuss decisions which affect the governance of CAS, and questions which pertain to CAS relations with federal partners, in order to preserve judicial independence in keeping with the purposes of the Courts Administration Service Act (s.2) and the respective roles and responsibilities of the Chief Justices and Chief Administrator as provided for under the Act. The Chief Administrator chairs the Committee.

National Judges Advisory Committees

CAS governance structure includes three subject matter Judges Advisory Committees on: Security, Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT), and Accommodations. These committees facilitate judicial involvement and collaboration on decisions pertaining to their respective areas. Sitting on each committee are judicial representatives from each of the four courts, supported by functional members from CAS. The committees submit their recommendations to the CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee for consideration and endorsement. The Chief Administrator chairs all three committees.

Executive Committee

The mandate of the Executive Committee (ExCom) is to support the Chief Administrator in making informed and responsible decisions pertaining to the management and administration of the organization and to the services it provides to the four courts. ExCom serves as a forum for establishing the strategic direction on a wide range of issues, identifying corporate needs and considering the potential outcome of decisions on the priorities and resources of the organization and the four courts.

Senior Management Committee

The Senior Management Committee (SMC) plays an important role in all planning activities and also assists the decision-making process by reviewing operational and policy issues and making recommendations to ExCom. It is also responsible for the implementation of final decisions taken by ExCom. Membership comprises the executive cadre of the organization.

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee (AC) provides the Chief Administrator with advice and recommendations regarding the sufficiency, quality and results of assurance on the adequacy and functioning of CAS’ risk management, control and governance frameworks and processes, including accountability and auditing systems.

Its membership includes the Chief Administrator, who also chairs the Committee, and two external members: Ms. Leslie Sandra Holland, Q.C. and Mr. James D. Wright, CPA, CA.

Our Priorities

  • Maintain core judicial and registry services to the four courts.
  • Strengthen security for members of the courts, their users, and employees.
  • Modernize technology to support the smooth running of the courts.
  • Maximize the use of our limited resources while ensuring the long term financial sustainability of CAS.
  • Foster a positive and empowering work environment which addresses the needs of our employees.
  • Implement a new governance structure to better serve the courts.

Part II The courts we support


The fundamental imperative is to ensure the courts have the support they need to provide timely and fair access to justice


CAS’ service delivery model is centered on meeting the specific requirements of four separate and independent Courts, each with distinct priorities, challenges, expectations and client needs.

The role of CAS is to provide administrative services to the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. The four Courts served by CAS are superior courts of record. They were established by the Parliament of Canada pursuant to its authority under section 101 of the Constitution Act, 1867 “for the better administration of the Laws of Canada.”

In the exercise of their respective roles, each Court makes decisions, interprets and establishes precedents, sets standards and raises questions of law on matters which affect Canadians and foreigners. The services provided by CAS permit individuals, companies, organizations and the provincial and federal governments to submit disputes and other matters to the Courts, and enable the Courts to hear and resolve the cases before them fairly, expeditiously, and as efficiently as possible.

Federal Court of Appeal

The Federal Court of Appeal is a national, bilingual, bijural, superior court of record, which has jurisdiction to hear appeals of judgments and orders, whether final or interlocutory, of the Federal Court and the Tax Court of Canada. It may also review decisions of certain federal tribunals pursuant to section 27 of the Federal Courts Act and hear appeals under other acts of Parliament.

Twelve judges, including two supernumerary judges, headed by a Chief Justice carry out the functions and responsibilities assigned by law to the Federal Court of Appeal. In 2012-13, 595 proceedings were instituted or filed in the Federal Court of Appeal, and 1,554 court judgments, orders and directions were issued. In that same year, 278 cases were heard in 187 days in court.

Further information on the Federal Court of Appeal can be found at: www.fca-caf.gc.ca.

Federal Court

The Federal Court is a national, bilingual, bijural, superior court of record, which hears and decides legal disputes arising in the federal domain. It is the successor to the Exchequer Court of Canada which was established in 1875. The jurisdiction of the Federal Court derives primarily from the Federal Courts Act, though over 100 other federal statutes also confer jurisdiction on the Court. The Federal Court has original, but not exclusive, jurisdiction over proceedings by and against the Crown (including Aboriginal law claims), and proceedings involving admiralty law and intellectual property law. It has exclusive jurisdiction to hear certain national security proceedings as well as applications for judicial review of the decisions of most federal boards, commissions and tribunals. This includes applications for judicial review of decisions of the Immigration and Refugee Board.

Thirty-five judges, including four supernumerary judges, and six prothonotaries headed by a Chief Justice carry out the functions and responsibilities assigned by law to the Federal Court. In 2012-13, 38,441 proceedings were instituted or filed in the Federal Court, and 23,387 court judgments, orders, and directions were issued. In that same year 5,493 cases were heard in 3,042 days in court.

Further information on the Federal Court can be found at: www.fct-cf.gc.ca.

Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

The Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada is a national, bilingual, superior court of record, which hears appeals of court martial decisions. Courts martial are military courts established under the National Defence Act, which hear cases under the Code of Service Discipline.

Fifty-nine judges headed by a Chief Justice can be called upon to carry out the functions and responsibilities assigned by law to the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada. Court Martial Appeal Court judges also sit as judges in other courts. In 2012-13, 9 proceedings were instituted or filed in the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada, and 27 court judgments, orders and directions were issued. In that same year, 3 cases were heard in 3 days in court.

Further information on the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada can be found at: www.cmac-cacm.ca.

Tax Court of Canada

The Tax Court of Canada is a national, bilingual, bijural, superior court of record, which has exclusive original jurisdiction to hear appeals and references pursuant to fourteen acts of Parliament. Most of the appeals filed with the Court are on matters arising under: Income Tax Act, Part IX of the Excise Tax Act (GST), Part IV of the Employment Insurance Act, and Part I of the Canada Pension Plan. The constitution of the Tax Court of Canada is established by section 4 of the Tax Court of Canada Act.

The Chief Justice, the Associate Chief Justice, twenty-three judges, including three supernumerary judges, carry out the functions and responsibilities assigned by law to the Tax Court of Canada. In 2012-13, 5,381 appeals were instituted or filed in the Tax Court of Canada, and 9,544 court judgments, orders and directions were issued. In that same year, 914 cases were heard in 1,800 scheduled court sitting days.

Further information on the Tax Court of Canada can be found at: www.tcc-cci.gc.ca.

Serving the Courts across Canada

The four Courts served by CAS are itinerant courts that sit and hear cases across Canada.

In 2012-13, CAS had 612 employees in permanent offices in ten cities across Canada. The head office is located in Ottawa and its main regional offices are in Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver. Where CAS does not have local offices, court accommodations are provided through arrangements with provincial courts, commercial leases or in other facilities throughout Canada.

Permanent Offices Across Canada:

Permanent Offices Across Canada

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Provincial and Territorial Partners:

To provide access to registry services and ensure the availability of courtrooms across Canada, CAS has key agreements with the provinces and territories of Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, and Yukon.

Part III Committee Participation


Committee participation is essential to our role in supporting the Courts


In 2012-13, CAS continued to play an active role in the following committees:

  • Rules Committee of the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court;
  • Rules Committee of the Tax Court of Canada;
  • Canadian Bar Association Liaison Committees;
  • Indigenous Bar Association – Aboriginal Law Bar Liaison Committee;
  • Immigration and Refugee Law Bar Committee;
  • Maritime Law Bar Liaison Committee;
  • Intellectual Property Law Bar Liaison Committee; and
  • Montréal Bar Liaison Committees.

Rules Committees

Rules committees are the bodies that consider and approve changes to courts rules. These committees are extremely important as they have a direct impact on judicial and registry services provided by CAS.

The membership of the Rules Committee of the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court includes representatives of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Canadian Bar Association, the Department of Justice, the academic community and the Chief Administrator of CAS. In 2012-13, CAS provided legal and administrative support to the Federal Courts Rules committee and assisted with the global review and amendments to the Federal Courts Rules. Since their introduction in 1998, the rules had never been revised in their entirety. The amendments were published in February 2013.

The membership of the Tax Court of Canada Rules Committee includes representatives of the Tax Court of Canada, of the Attorney General of Canada, of the Canadian Bar Association and the Chief Administrator of CAS. In 2012-13, the organization continued to provide legal and administrative support to the members of the rules committee of the Tax Court of Canada, and assisted with proposed amendments to various rules that were published in Part I of the Canada Gazette in December 2012. Following the publication, comments were received, and the proposed amendments were sent to the Governor in Council for final approval.

Canadian Bar Association Liaison Committees

In 2012-13, CAS continued to provide support to the Canadian Bar Association Liaison Committees. There is one Liaison Committee with the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court, and another with the Tax Court of Canada. These committees give members of the Canadian Bar Association and the Department of Justice a forum to exchange on common issues and discuss proposed changes to the litigation process in certain areas. While the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court and the Tax Court of Canada sit on the Canadian Bar Association Liaison Committees, these committees are not court committees. Discussion papers may be posted on the Bar’s website.

Part IV The year in brief


WE HAVE

Maintained judicial and registry services

Reinforced our governance structure

Increased resources in direct support to the courts

Implemented new work tools


Maintaning Core Judicial and Registry Services to the Four Courts

In 2012-13, CAS focused on maintaining its capacity to deliver on its mandate by prioritizing the allocation of its limited resources to meet the essential needs of the four courts and by taking action on various initiatives that improved core services and helped alleviate financial pressures. This was essential as the increase in the workload of the courts resulted in a corresponding rise in demand for CAS services. In particular, the Federal Court saw a major increase in immigration-related applications. This increase, which more than doubled since 2007, was largely due to amendments to immigration legislation. Similarly, in 2012-13, the Tax Court of Canada experienced caseload increases in appeals and applications of about 22% over the average of the previous three years. In parallel to this rise in volume, there was an increase in the complexity of cases.

Another major factor putting pressure on resources is the large and growing number of self-represented litigants requiring support. Over the past few years, the registries of the Federal Court and the Tax Court of Canada each have reported increases of around 50% in self-represented litigants. In addition, self-represented litigants typically require more assistance and draw on more CAS resources when they are preparing for their hearings.

Consequently, CAS allocated additional resources to the Judicial Services and the Registry Services programs to address their increasing workloads. Priority was also given to the development of the Digital Audio Recording System (DARS), the On-line Law Clerk Application System, the Law Clerk Memo Retrieval System and the maintenance of the E-filing System.

However, all possibilities for reallocation have been exhausted. Any further transfers of resources would leave CAS and the courts vulnerable and could eventually result in delays or denial of services and adversely affect access to justice.

Strengthen Security

The security of the federal courts, as well as the safety of their members, CAS employees, litigants and members of the public, are of primordial importance for the organization. With changes to legislations in areas such as immigration and anti-terrorism, the courts must deal with the increasing number of cases that require special security precautions. This is also true for the increasing proportion of self-represented litigants. To enhance security and mitigate risks, CAS continued to work closely with representatives of the four courts through the CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee and the National Judges Committee on Security.

CAS initiated a comprehensive Threat and Risk Assessment (TRA) of the courts’ system to identify key improvements required to enhance security. The TRA results will assist the organization in confirming its priorities and in allocating its resources to security initiatives that address key risks and improve its security posture in facilities across Canada. The report will present benchmarks and findings on security programs, services and measures found in provincial, territorial and some comparable international jurisdictions. The TRA is also expected to highlight required investments in security for the courts and provide the necessary basis for discussion with senior officials from other government departments about their roles and responsibilities in the management of courts’ security.

In 2012-13, contracts for external security expertise were put in place to provide for comprehensive national security services required for the installation and maintenance of CAS security systems and infrastructure. These contracts also facilitate the standardization and enhancement of CAS monitoring and detection capabilities, and its security support systems.

CAS also provided mandatory security training to employees, promoted security awareness in the workplace, conducted a review of its business continuity plans, and established a strategy to enhance existing processes and to ensure the continuation of critical services, when and where required.

Project Spotlight

Digital Audio Recording System:

Digital Audio Recording SystemThe Digital Audio Recording System (DARS) has been a priority for the Federal Court and the Tax Court of Canada for a number of years.

DARS is a tool developed to record court proceedings and has been configured to meet the specific judicial needs of each court. Its core function is to convert the audio signal from the various microphones into a digital format and store it as a computer file. Using its multi-channel recording capabilities, individual speakers can be isolated on playback to improve the accuracy of transcripts. Once recorded, the digital audio files may be replayed to create a transcript of the proceedings and the system also allows the operator to annotate and pinpoint specific segments in the recordings for quick access.

In 2012-13, CAS delivered orientation training to more than 150 employees across Canada. Forty-five systems were installed across the country and used in the recording of hearings.

The DARS project team was nominated for CAS National Awards in several categories and won the Teamwork Award in 2012-13. The introduction of the system marks an important step towards the digitization of the Courts.

Modernize Technology

The four courts served by CAS sit and hear cases across Canada. Members of these courts depend on CAS to provide them with secure, fast and reliable networks and systems.

Further, the ability to file documents electronically is increasingly important to litigants and the courts. As such, the modernization of CAS networks, systems and software solutions is a top priority for the members of the courts and their users.

However, many of the existing judicial systems used for managing court operations and handling court documents are obsolete, slow, unreliable and costly to maintain. In addition, the courts are still largely dependent on paper-based information, photocopying and physical delivery of documents.

While efforts were made to move toward modernized courtrooms, digital court processes and electronic document management, funding restraints severely limited the resources available for strategic projects necessary to address critical risk areas and allow the organization to become more effective and efficient in its delivery of services to the courts and litigants. Nonetheless, CAS forged ahead and developed an IM/IT Strategic Plan to address some of the key concerns, and ensure that all IM/IT investments added value to the organization, maximized business benefits and minimized risks.

CAS made some upgrades to its IT infrastructure, which included a new data centre, computer systems and security systems. These upgrades improved the security and integrity of CAS networks, business systems and information resources of business value. Furthermore, CAS implemented a Digital Audio Recording System (DARS) to record court proceedings, and made significant upgrades to its videoconferencing platform, thereby improving the quality, efficiency, and accessibility of the services offered to the courts. CAS also started implementing a secure internet-based Electronic Filing System which allows a party or their legal representative to upload and file documents electronically with the Federal Court. An on-line application tool for the hiring of law clerks was launched to reduce the workload associated with the management of appli­cation forms and the interview process. In parallel, a memo retrieval system was implemented at the Federal Court of Appeal and at the Tax Court of Canada to enable judges, law clerks, and judicial assistants to access and retrieve key information more rapidly and efficiently.

To address its policy requirements for IM/IT and Information Management and Records Management (IM/RM), CAS is in the process of developing its IM/IT Policy Framework, IM/RM framework and Implementation Plan, Recordkeeping Implementation Plan and a Judicial Vision and, Judicial Information Framework.

To realise these accomplishments, CAS had to be financed in part through a loan which must be repaid over a five-year period. To finance future investments in vital projects, CAS must identify a new source of funds. Over the coming years, CAS will need to give high priority to improving network accessibility and increasing the speed of connectivity for the regions. This is essential to facilitate the work of the itinerary courts which require support across Canada.

Project Spotlight

New Data Centre

New Data CentreThe construction and relocation of the data centre was a key step towards the improve­ment of the IT infrastructure. Work on the new facilities was completed in the fall of 2012 and the physical move occurred later that year. Although the infrastructure remains vulnerable, this upgraded facility is an initiative among many others in a portfolio of projects to improve and strengthen network per­formance, address certain vulnerabilities and facilitate the implementation of modern judicial systems and tools.

Once all equipment had been fully installed and optimized, benefits for CAS and the courts will include higher network speed, increased capacity for future network expansion, greater storage capacity, increased reliability and performance of business solutions and an IT infrastructure that is more stable and easier to manage.

Maximize the Use of our Limited Resources

A long-term lack of resources has seriously undermined the ability of CAS to meet the requirements of the courts. CAS’ funding does not reflect the varying and expanding workload of the courts, the evolving needs of members of the courts, the need to modernize court-related technological systems and infrastructures, or the security measures necessary to mitigate related risks.

To maximize the use of its limited financial resources, CAS remained prudent in its business planning and budget exercises as well as in its staffing actions. With the involvement of the CAS Chief Justices Steering Committee, the organization took major steps to review its strategic approach and priorities for the next five years, while also addressing corporate risks, budget allocation, and other significant matters affecting the conduct of the courts. As a result, CAS reinforced its governance, risk management and investment planning, and enhanced its internal controls.

CAS increased its focus on high priority initiatives to ensure that the organization remained well-positioned to continue to deliver essential services to the four courts. The organization continued to closely monitor its expenses and promptly address any emerging financial risk. However, despite these efforts, CAS still requires additional funding to meet the evolving and essential needs of the courts and to fulfill its mandate. Setting the federal courts system on a firm and sustainable financial base through the provision of adequate long-term funding would resolve this longstanding problem, maintain the integrity of courts’ support programs and enhance access to justice. To address program integrity issues, CAS prepared a business case identifying the level of program integrity funding required, and continued to work collaboratively with central agencies to develop a more sustainable, sound and stable funding model.

Foster a Positive and Empowering Work Environment

CAS is a service-delivery organization that relies on a highly qualified, experienced and engaged workforce. In 2012-13, CAS provided employees with necessary training to perform their essential duties. Training on security, diversity and the new Digital Audio Recording System was offered to employees, as well as information sessions on duty to accommodate. Subject matter experts were also identified within the organization to deliver training, learning circles and workshops on information management, classification and performance management. In addition, a mentoring program was launched in collaboration with Infrastructure Canada to allow employees to develop important leadership competencies.

CAS continued the development of its Talent Management Program which will be implemented in 2013-14. The main objectives are to identify leadership competencies in executive-equivalent employees within the organization and establish a plan for the collaborative development of the management talents of each of the selected candidates.

In light of the new Values and Ethics Code of Conduct for the Public Service, CAS led extensive consultations with employees in all regions and head office to develop an organizational Code of Conduct. This provided a great opportunity to communicate the new public service code to employees.

CAS conducted a nationwide consultation to address issues raised by employees in the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) and update its 2011-14 PSES action plan. As a result, Directors General and Directors have been tasked to implement various elements of the plan, which is expected to be fully implemented in 2013-14. This approach places clear accountabilities on the CAS management team.

Implement a New Governance Structure

Over the past few years, CAS’ senior management has made efforts to rethink the way in which the organization delivers its services. In 2012-13, the Chief Administrator worked closely with the four Chief Justices and implemented a new organizational structure. This important change amalgamated the Judicial Services Branch with the Registry Services Branch, and improved the organization’s ability to offer better and more coordinated services that are tailored to each court and their respective clienteles. More specifically, this change streamlined the reporting structure and allowed for better services to the Chief Justices.

To strengthen its planning, monitoring and reporting capability, CAS overhauled its auditing and financial management functions and particular attention was placed on the organization’s exposure to risks that are inherent to CAS’ business and the unique characteristics of the Canadian judicial system.

An improved governance structure for investment planning also helped CAS ensure that its investment decisions fully supported the priorities of the organization and the needs of the courts. The investment plan emphasizes the importance of security and technology renewal, elements which remain fundamental to the effective delivery of justice by the four courts.

Finally, CAS continued to improve its overall management practices in the various areas measured by the Treasury Board Secretariat through the Management Accountability Framework. In 2012-13, CAS achieved strong results for governance and leadership in the following areas of management: Financial Management and Control; Risk Management; and People Management. As a result of its sustained efforts and new governance structure, CAS is more apt to address its key priorities and promote continual management improvement through the implementation of best practices.

Part V Courts Statistics

The following statistics provide a record of the workload handled by the employees of the Judicial and Registry Services Branch in support of the four federal Courts.

Federal Court of Appeal 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Proceedings Instituted or Filed 595 471 527 542
Court Judgments, Orders and Directions Processed by the Registry 1,554 1,588 1,674 1,272
Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court 278 334 370 356
Days in Court 187 226 246 215
Recorded Entries 20,622 20,566 20,632 20,506
Total Dispositions 490 511 565 629
Active Proceedings as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Appeals from Federal Court (Final Judgment) 122 137 131 164
Appeals from Federal Court (Interlocutory Judgment) 58 46 35 35
Appeals from Tax Court of Canada 86 96 145 118
Applications for Judicial Review 182 65 75 102
Others 19 16 17 28
Total 467 360 403 447
Status as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Not perfected 251 234 258 294
Perfected 23 28 37 39
Consolidated 119 20 22 14
Reserved 15 24 18 15
Scheduled for hearing 43 36 46 72
Stayed 16 18 22 13
Total 467 360 403 447

 

Federal Court 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Proceedings Instituted or Filed 38,441 31,527 30,786 33,866
General Proceedings and Immigration 13,940 12,379 9,766 8,692
Income Tax Act certificates 13,277 10,737 12,333 15,630
Excise Tax Act certificates 10,795 7,789 8,147 9,077
Other instruments and certificates 429 622 540 467
Court Judgments, Orders and Directions Processed by the Registry 23,387 22,184 21,205 19,866
Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court 5,493 4,385 4,215 4,407
Days in Court 3,042 2,961 2,996 3,019
Recorded Entries 287,878 254,147 238,525 233,038
Total Dispositions – General Proceedings and Immigration 11,610 10,555 9,362 8,821
Active Proceedings as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Aboriginal 232 240 210 224
Other appeals provided for by law 156 142 120 109
Admiralty 233 234 270 284
Intellectual property 532 548 626 677
Immigration 6,835 4,705 2,895 2,565
Crown 341 291 315 305
Judicial Review 783 747 702 668
Patented Medicines Regulations 88 74 71 70
Total 9,200 6,981 5,209 4,902
Status as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Not perfected 6,477 4,650 3,511 3,303
Perfected 1,490 759 570 696
Consolidated 64 37 61 30
Reserved 208 207 144 127
Scheduled for hearing 641 636 481 422
Stayed 320 692 442 324
Total 9,200 6,981 5,209 4,902

 

Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Proceedings Instituted or Filed 9 6 5 10
Court Judgments, Orders and Directions Processed by the Registry 27 24 33 54
Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court 3 8 3 10
Days in Court 3 8 2 10
Recorded Entries 282 260 311 534
Total Dispositions 5 5 10 10
Active Proceedings as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Application for review of a direction 0 0 0 0
Notice of Appeal 8 5 4 11
Application for review of an undertaking 0 0 0 0
Notice of motion commencing an appeal 0 0 0 0
Total 8 5 4 11
Status as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Not perfected 5 2 1 5
Perfected 1 1 1 0
Consolidated 0 0 0 0
Reserved 0 2 0 5
Scheduled for hearing 2 0 2 1
Stayed 0 0 0 0
Total 8 5 4 11

 

Tax Court of Canada 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Proceedings Instituted or Filed 5,381 4,750 4,222 4,444
Court Judgments, Orders and Directions Processed by the Registry 9,544 9,637 11,793 10,333
Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court 914 984 1,182 1,175
Days in Court* 1,800 1,908 2,126 2,066
Recorded Entries 147,884 147,484 158,102 145,614
Total Dispositions 4,406 4,859 4,998 4,373
Active Proceedings as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Goods and Services Tax 1,390 1,299 1,145 1,014
Income Tax 6,335 5,482 5,616 6,152
Employment Insurance and Canada Pension Plan 470 224 291 593
Others 25 157 167 277
Total 8,220 7,162 7,219 8,036
Status as of March 31, 2013 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10
Not perfected 1,417 1,432 789 815
Perfected 1,897 1,450 2,355 2,772
Reserved 110 95 149 160
Awaiting timetable 267 150 107 212
Scheduled for hearing 1,074 1,150 764 904
Specially Managed Cases 1,747 1,454 1,724 1,811
Awaiting another decision 1,708 1,431 1,331 1,362
Total 8,220 7,162 7,219 8,036

* For the Tax Court of Canada “Days in Court” is defined as the number of court sitting days scheduled.

Project Spotlight

Online Application Tool For Law Clerks

Outil de demande d’emploi en ligne pour l’embauche des auxiliaires juridiquesInitiated during the previous reporting period, the Online Law Clerk Application Tool became a reality in 2012-13 with its successful deployment at the Federal Court of Appeal and the Federal Court. This tool was developed in-house by a project team whose specialties ranged from system design and development to law.

This application tool allows students from various law faculties across Canada to apply online for clerkship positions. This tool also includes a questionnaire to be completed by applicants which facilitates the search and selection process.

In 2012-13, CAS received positive feedback on the new application from both the members of the courts and the applicants.

The project team won the CAS National Award for Creativity and Innovation.

Part VI Financial Highlights

Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Courts Administration Service

Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2013, and all information contained in these statements rests with the management of the Courts Administration Service. These financial statements have been prepared by management using the Government’s accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgment, and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Courts Administration Service’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted in the preparation of the Public Accounts of Canada, and included in the Courts Administration Service’s Departmental Performance Report, is consistent with these financial statements.

Management is also responsible for maintaining an effective system of Internal Control over Financial Reporting (ICFR) designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are properly authorized and recorded in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and other applicable legislation, regulations, authorities and policies.

Management seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements through careful selection, training, and development of qualified staff; through organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility; through communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards, and managerial authorities are understood throughout the Courts Administration Service and through conducting an annual risk-based assessment of the effectiveness of the system of ICFR.

The system of ICFR is designed to mitigate risks to a reasonable level based on an ongoing process to identify key risks, to assess effectiveness of associated key controls, and to make any necessary adjustments.

A risk-based assessment of the system of ICFR for the year ended March 31, 2013 was completed in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Control and the results and action plans are summarized in the annex.

The effectiveness and adequacy of the Courts Administration Service’s system of internal control is reviewed by the work of the Chief Audit Executive, who conducts periodic audits of different areas of the Courts Administration Service’s operations, and by the Departmental Audit Committee, which oversees management’s responsibilities for maintaining adequate control systems and the quality of financial reporting, and which recommends the financial statements to the Deputy Head of the Courts Administration Service.

The financial statements of the Courts Administration Service have not been audited.

Daniel Gosselin, FCPA, FCA
Deputy Head
Chief Administrator

Francine Côté, CPA, CA, CISA
Chief Financial Officer
Deputy Chief Administrator,
Corporate Services

Ottawa, Canada
August 30, 2013

Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)

As at March 31
(in thousands of dollars)

Liabilities

2013 2012
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 4) 3,160 4,900
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 2,047 2,158
Deposit accounts (Note 5) 6,776 6,529
Employee future benefits (Note 6) 3,132 3,359
Total liabilities 15,115 16,946

Assets

2013 2012
Financial assets
Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 7,459 9,447
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 7) 2,423 1,989
Total gross financial assets 9,882 11,436
Financial assets held on behalf of Government
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 7) (2,078) (1,614)
Total net financial assets 7,804 9,822
Departmental net debt 7,311 7,124
Non-financial assets
Tangible capital assets (Note 8) 7,853 6,516
Total non-financial assets 7,853 6,516
Departmental net financial position 542 (608)

Contingent liabilities (Note 9) The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Daniel Gosselin, FCPA, FCA
Deputy Head
Chief Administrator

Francine Côté, CPA, CA, CISA
Chief Financial Officer
Deputy Chief Administrator,
Corporate Services

Ottawa, Canada
August 30, 2013

Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)

For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)

Expenses

Forecast 2013 2013 2012
Judicial services 43,343 41,865 42,105
Registry services 32,441 31,849 32,921
Internal services 21,156 19,688 22,182
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government (14)
Total Expenses 96,940 93,402 97,194

Revenues

Forecast 2013 2013 2012
Employment Insurance Operating Account cost recoveries (Note 2(d)) 1,233 2,042 1,576
Filing fees 1,446 1,901 1,644
Fines 5,524 1,574 1,066
Miscellaneous 91 95 109
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (8,294) (5,608) (4,388)
Total Revenues 4 7
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 96,940 93,398 97,187

Government funding and transfers

Forecast 2013 2013 2012
Net cash provided by Government 68,520 66,981 71,021
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund (375) (1,988) 1,807
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 10) 30,296 29,555 30,981
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (1,501) (1,150) (6,622)
Departmental net financial position – Beginning of year (559) (608) (7,230)
Departmental net financial position – End of year 942 542 (608)

Segmented information (Note 11) The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt (Unaudited)

For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)

Forecast 2013 2013 2012
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (1,501) (1,150) (6,622)
Change due to tangible capital assets
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 1,919 2,233 2,623
Amortization of tangible capital assets (1,183) (674) (621)
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (3) (4)
Net (loss) or gain on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments (219) (1)
Total change due to tangible capital assets 736 1,337 1,997
Change due to prepaid expenses (4)
Net increase (decrease) in departmental net debt (765) 187 (4,629)
Departmental net debt – Beginning of year 6,451 7,124 11,753
Departmental net debt – End of year 5,686 7,311 7,124

Segmented information (Note 11)
The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)

For the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)

Operating activities

2013 2012
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 93,398 97,187
Non-cash items:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (Note 8) (674) (621)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 10) (29,555) (30,981)
Gain (Loss) on disposal and write-down of tangible capital assets (219) (1)
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:
Increase (decrease) in accounts receivable and advances (30) 71
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses (4)
(Increase) decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities 1,740 (1,653)
(Increase) decrease in vacation pay and compensatory leave 111 (338)
(Increase) decrease in deposit accounts (247) (580)
(Increase) decrease in employee future benefits 227 5,322
Cash used in operating activities 64,751 68,402

Capital investing activities

2013 2012
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets (Note 8) 2,233 2,623
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (3) (4)
Cash used in capital investing activities 2,230 2,619
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 66,981 71,021

The accompanying notes form an integral part of the financial statements.

Notes to the Financial Statements (Unaudited)

For the year ended March 31

1. Authority and objectives

The Courts Administration Service, which was established on July 2, 2003 by the Courts Administration Service Act, S.C. 2002, c.8, is responsible for providing administrative services to the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada (the courts).

These services permit individuals, companies, organizations and the Government of Canada to submit disputes and other matters to the courts, and enable the courts to hear and resolve the cases before them fairly, without delay and as efficiently as possible.

The Courts Administration Service has three programs: to provide Judicial Services, to provide Registry Services and to provide Internal Services.

Judicial Services provides legal services and judicial administrative support to assist members of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada in the discharge of their judicial functions. These services are provided by legal counsel, judicial administrators, law clerks, jurilinguists, judicial assistants, library personnel and court attendants, under the direction of the four Chief Justices.

Registry Services are delivered under the jurisdiction of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. The registries process legal documents; provide information to litigants on court procedures, maintain court records, participate in court hearings, support and assist in the enforcement of court orders, and work closely with the Offices of the four Chief Justices to ensure that matters are heard, and decisions are rendered in a timely manner. Registry Services are offered in every province and territory through a network of permanent offices, and agreements with provincial and territorial partners.

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2. Summary of significant accounting policies

These financial statements have been prepared using the Government’s accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a) Parliamentary authorities

The Courts Administration Service is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary authorities. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the Courts Administration Service do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 3 provides a reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

The forecast amounts in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in the Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt are the amounts reported in the Future-oriented Financial Statements included in the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities. The Future-oriented Financial Statements for 2012-13 have been restated to reflect the revenue net of non-respendable amounts. This restatement resulted in a $8,294,000 increase in net costs of operations before government funding and transfers. In addition, the Future-oriented Financial Statements have also been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

(b) Net cash provided by Government

The Courts Administration Service operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Courts Administration Service is deposited to the CRF, and all cash disbursements made by the Courts Administration Service are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements, including transactions between departments of the Government.

(c) Due from or to the Consolidation Revenue Fund (CRF)

Amounts due from or to the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Courts Administration Service is entitled to draw from the CRF without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

(d) Revenues
  • Revenues consist primarily of filing fees, fines and Employment Insurance Operating Account cost recoveries. All such revenue is non-respendable.
  • All revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event that gave rise to the revenue takes place.
  • Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge the Courts Administration Service’s liabilities. While the Deputy Head is expected to maintain accounting control, he has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues. As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government and are therefore presented as a reduction of the entity’s gross revenues. Employment Insurance Operating Account cost recoveries: At the end of each fiscal year, the Courts Administration Service determines the cost associated with the administration of Employment Insurance (EI) cases. The total cost allocated by the Courts Administration Service for handling EI cases are expended against Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), the department responsible for the Employment Insurance Operating Account. As such, HRSDC would show an expense and the Courts Administration Service would show an equivalent, non-respendable revenue item. The purpose of this accounting exercise is to reflect more accurately the total cost of running the EI program and it is strictly internal to the Government.
(e) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on the accrual basis.

  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are accrued as the benefits are earned by employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, employer contributions to the health and dental insurance plans and workers’ compensation are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.
(f) Employee future benefits
  • Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer pension plan administered by the Government. The Courts Administration Service’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. The Courts Administration Service’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government, as the Plan’s sponsor.
  • Severance benefits: Employees entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment earn these benefits as services necessary to earn them are rendered. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.
(g) Accounts receivable

Accounts receivable are stated at the lower of cost and net recoverable value. A valuation allowance is recorded for accounts receivable where recovery is considered uncertain.

(h) Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities that may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(i) Tangible capital assets

All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $5,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. The Courts Administration Service does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian reserves and museum collections. Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

Asset class
Amortization Period
Machinery and equipment 10 years
Computer hardware 3 years
Computer software 4 years
Furniture and fixtures 10 years
Vehicles 10 years
Leasehold improvements Lesser of useful life or remainder of lease term

Assets under construction are recorded in the applicable capital asset class in the year that they become available for use and are not amortized until they become available for use.

(j) Measurement uncertainty

The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee future benefits and the useful life of tangible capital assets. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary authorities

The Courts Administration Service receives its funding through annual Parliamentary authorities. Items recognized in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and the Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Courts Administration Service has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used
(in thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 93,398 97,187
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Services provided without charge by other government departments (29,555) (30,981)
Amortization of tangible capital assets (674) (621)
Decrease (increase) in vacation pay and compensatory leave 111 (338)
Decrease (increase) in employee future benefits 227 5,322
Gain (Loss) on disposal and write-down of tangible capital assets (219) (1)
Refund of previous year expenditures 12 28
Adjustments of previous years payables at year-end (PAYE) 45 14
Other 7 (4)
Total items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities (30,046) (26,581)
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 2,233 2,623
Increase (decrease) in advances (1) (2)
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses (4)
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities 2,232 2,617
Current year authorities used 65,584 73,223
(b) Authorities provided and used
(in thousands of dollars) 2013 2012
Authorities provided:
Vote 30 – Program expenditures 64,245 71,519
Statutory authorities 7,016 7,158
Less:
Lapsed authorities (5,673) (5,446)
Authorities available for future years (4) (8)
Current year authorities used 65,584 73,223

4. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

The following table presents details of the Courts Administration Service’s accounts payable and accrued liabilities:

(in thousands of dollars)
2013 2012
Accounts payable - Other government departments and agencies 355 982
Accounts payable - External parties 1,847 2,948
  2,202 3,930
Accrued liabilities 958 970
  3,160 4,900

5. Deposit accounts

The Courts Administration Service maintains two deposit accounts on behalf of litigants before the courts. Pursuant to an order of the Court, the deposit accounts will record funds paid into the Federal Court of Appeal, Federal Court and Tax Court of Canada. These amounts are held as payments and eventually released, pending judgment of the courts. The difference between these two accounts is the calculation of interest, as described below.

Calculation of Interest:

Deposit Account for the Federal Court of Appeal and Federal Court: Pursuant to the Order in Council P.C. 1970 4/2, the account earns interest semi-annually at a rate that is equal to nine-tenths of the monthly average of tender rates for three-month Treasury bills and is calculated on the minimum monthly balance.

Deposit Account for the Tax Court of Canada: Pursuant to the Order in Council P.C. 1970-300, the account earns interest semiannually at a rate that is equal to ninety percent of the average of the weekly three-month Treasury bills and is calculated on a daily basis.

(in thousands of dollars)
2013
2012
Balance, beginning of year 6,529 5,949
Receipts and other credits 1,781 4,885
Disbursements and other charges (1,534) (4,305)
Balance, end of year 6,776 6,529

6. Employee future benefits

(a) Pension benefits

The Courts Administration Service’s employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the Courts Administration Service contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2012-13 expense amounts to $4,998,014 ($5,138,002 in 2011-12), which represents approximately 1.7 times (1.8 times in 2011-12) the contributions by employees.

The Courts Administration Service’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government, as the Plan’s sponsor.

(b) Severance benefits

The Courts Administration Service provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and salary at termination of employment. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future authorities.

As part of collective agreement negotiations with certain employee groups, and changes to conditions of employment for executives and certain non-represented employees, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased for these employees. Employees subject to these changes have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service. These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)
2013
2012
Accrued benefit obligation - Beginning of year 3,359 8,681
Expense for the year 165 819
Benefits paid during the year (392) (6,141)
Accrued benefit obligation - End of year 3,132 3,359

7. Accounts receivable and advances

The following table presents details of the Courts Administration Service’s accounts receivable and advances balances:

(in thousands of dollars)
2013
2012
Accounts receivable - Other government departments and agencies 2,391 1,973
Accounts receivable - External parties 29 23
Advances 8 9
2,428 2,005
Allowance for doubtful accounts on accounts receivable from external parties (5) (16)
Gross accounts receivable and advances 2,423 1,989
Accounts receivable held on behalf of Government (2,078) (1,614)
Net accounts receivable and advances 345 375

 

8. Tangible capital assets

Cost
(in thousands of dollars)
2012
Acquisitions
Adjustments
(1)
Disposals and
Write-Offs
2013
Machinery and equipment 714 - - - 714
Computer hardware 3,885 471 116 - 4,472
Computer software 1,438 529 41 (201) 1,807
Furniture and fixtures 782 17 - - 799
Vehicles 404 - - (29) 375
Leasehold improvements 2,859 1,216 519 - 4,594
Assets under construction - Computer software 547 - (41) (21) 485
Assets under construction - Leasehold improvements 635 - (635) - -
Total 11,264 2,233 - (251) 13,246

Accumulated amortization
(in thousands of dollars)
2012
Amortization
Adjustments
(1)
Disposals and
Write-Offs
2013
Machinery and equipment 625 19 - - 644
Computer hardware 2,584 295 - - 2,879
Computer software 319 141 - - 460
Furniture and fixtures 749 22 - - 771
Vehicles 211 35 - (29) 217
Leasehold improvements 260 162 - - 422
Total 4,748 674 - (29) 5,393

Net book value
(in thousands of dollars)
2012
2013
Machinery and equipment 89 70
Computer hardware 1,301 1,593
Computer software 1,119 1,347
Furniture and fixtures 33 28
Vehicles 193 158
Leasehold improvements 2,599 4,172
Assets under construction - Computer software 547 485
Assets under construction - Leasehold improvements 635 -
Total 6,516 7,853

(1) Adjustments include assets under construction that were transferred to the other categories upon completion of the assets.

9. Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities arise in the normal course of operations and their ultimate disposition is unknown.

Claims and litigation

Claims have been made against the Courts Administration Service in the normal course of operations. These claims include items with pleading amounts and others for which no amount is specified. Claims and litigations for which the outcome is not determinable and a reasonable estimate can be made by management amount to approximately $65,000 at March 31, 2013 ($40,000 at March 31, 2012).

10. Related party transactions

The Courts Administration Service is related as a result of common ownership to all government departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The Courts Administration Service enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

(a) Common services provided without charge by other government departments

During the year, the Courts Administration Service received services without charge from certain common service organizations, related to accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and workers’ compensation coverage. These services provided without charge have been recorded in the Courts Administration Service’s Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)
2013
2012
Accommodation (1) 25,836 26,919
Employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans 3,692 4,023
Workers' compensation 27 39
Total 29,555 30,981

(1) Accommodation costs include the space of the courtrooms, the offices of the members of the courts, the discovery rooms, etc.

The Government has centralized some of its administrative activities for efficiency, cost-effectiveness purposes and economic delivery of programs to the public. As a result, the Government uses central agencies and common service organizations so that one department performs services for all other departments and agencies without charge. The costs of these services, such as the payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada are not included in the Courts Administration Service’s Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position.

(b) Other transactions with related parties
(in thousands of dollars)
2013
2012
Revenues - Other government departments and agencies 2,308 1,814
Expenses - Other government departments and agencies 10,968 11,798

Expenses and revenues disclosed in (b) exclude common services provided without charge, which are already disclosed in (a).

11. Segmented information

Presentation by segment is based on the Courts Administration Service’s program alignment architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in note 2. The following table presents the expenses incurred and revenues generated for the main programs, by major object of expense and by major type of revenue. The segment results for the period are as follows:

(in thousands of dollars) Judicial Services Registry Services Internal Services 2013 2012
Expenses
Salaries and employee benefits 16,752 22,903 12,634 52,289 53,560
Accommodations (Note 10) 19,590 4,892 1,353 25,835 26,919
Professional and special services 3,163 3,050 1,698 7,911 8,585
Transportation and telecommunications 440 288 1,706 2,434 2,559
Materials and supplies 1,422 169 145 1,736 2,064
Rentals 97 155 1,153 1,405 1,023
Amortization of tangible capital assets 46 124 504 674 621
Information 231 146 40 417 131
Machinery and equipment 70 77 156 303 982
Repairs and maintenance 6 21 218 245 747
Miscellaneous 48 24 81 153 17
Expenses incurred on behalf of Government (14)
Total expenses 41,865 31,849 19,688 93,402 97,194
Revenues
Employment Insurance Operating Account cost recoveries 911 612 519 2,042 1,576
Filing fees 1,901 1,901 1,644
Fines 1,574 1,574 1,066
Miscellaneous 91 4 95 109
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (911) (4,178) (519) (5,608) (4,388)
Total revenues 4 4 7
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 41,865 31,849 19,684 93,398 97,187

 

Statement of Financial Position

Total net liabilities: CAS’ total liabilities as at March 31, 2013 were $15,115 thousand ($16,946 thousand as at March 31, 2012).

  • Accounts payable and accrued liabilities: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $3,160 thousand ($4,900 thousand as at March 31, 2012). The decrease of $1,740 thousand is mainly due to decreases in accounts payable to external parties and other government departments and agencies.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $2,047 thousand ($2,158 thousand as at March 31, 2012). The decrease is due to a slight increase in the utilization of vacation leave.
  • Deposit accounts: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $6,776 thousand ($6,529 thousand as at March 31, 2012). Because they reflect many separate decisions of the courts, deposits cannot be projected and the balance in the deposit accounts can vary significantly from year to year.
  • Employee future benefits: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $3,132 thousand ($3,359 thousand as at March 31, 2012). In 2011-12, significant changes were made to the employee severance pay program and these changes have resulted in a decrease in employee future benefits over the past two years.

Total net financial assets: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $7,804 thousand ($9,822 thousand as at March 31, 2012). This amount represents gross financial assets less financial assets held on behalf of the Government.

  • Gross financial assets: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $9,882 thousand ($11,436 thousand as at March 31, 2012). This decrease of $1,554 thousand is mainly due to a decrease in the amount due from the CRF. This amount represents the net amount of cash that CAS is entitled to withdraw from the CRF without generating additional charges against its authorities.
  • Financial assets held on behalf of Government: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $2,078 thousand ($1,614 thousand as at March 31, 2012). These assets consist primarily of accounts receivable from another governmental organization.

Departmental Net Debt: CAS’ departmental net debt (total liabilities less total net financial assets) was $7,311 thousand as at March 31, 2013 ($7,124 thousand as at March 31, 2012). The net debt indicator provides a measure of the future authorities required to pay for past transactions and events.

Total non-financial assets: The balance as at March 31, 2013 was $7,853 thousand ($6,516 thousand as at March 31, 2012). Non-financial assets consist of the tangible capital assets that are essential for the successful delivery of services required by the courts. Computer hardware and software (including assets under construction) totalled 44% of non-financial assets in 2012-13, while leasehold improvements accounted for 53%.

Re-investment in capital assets is crucial for maintaining secure modern facilities, updating technological infrastructure and information systems, and maintaining a reliable fleet of vehicles. CAS had tangible capital asset acquisitions of $2,233 thousand in 2012-13 ($2,623 thousand in 2011-12). Of this amount, $471 thousand (21%) related to computer hardware, $529 thousand (24%) related to computer software and $1,216 thousand (54%) related to leasehold improvements.

Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Total expenses: CAS’ total expenses were $93,402 thousand in 2012-13 ($97,194 thousand in 2011-12). The largest components in the decrease of $3,792 thousand (4%) were decreases of $1,271 thousand in salaries and employee benefits and $1,084 thousand in accommodations.

  • Salaries and employee benefits: Salary and employee benefit expenses were $52,289 thousand in 2012-13 ($53,560 thousand in 2011-12). The $1,271 thousand (2%) decrease compared to 2011-12 is primarily due to changes in the severance pay program that resulted in a peak in salaries and employee benefits in 2011-12. Over half of CAS’ total expenses consist of salaries and employee benefits.
  • Operating: Operating expenses were $41,113 thousand in 2012-13 ($43,634 thousand in 2011-12). The $2,521 thousand (6%) decrease compared to 2011-12 is attributable to decreases of $1,084 thousand in accommodations, $674 thousand in professional and special services, $679 thousand in machinery and equipment, and other minor variances totalling $84 thousand. The variances are primarily explained by the relocation of the corporate functions to the Federal Judicial Building in the National Capital Region and the construction of the new data centre.

Total revenues: CAS’ gross revenues were $5,611 thousand in 2012-13 ($4,395 thousand in 2011-12). Gross revenues consist largely of revenues earned on behalf of Government. Such revenues are non-respendable, meaning that they cannot be used by CAS, and are deposited directly into the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF).

Revenues earned on behalf of Government were $5,608 thousand in 2012-13 ($4,388 thousand in 2011-12). One major source of such revenues is fines and filing fees collected pursuant to the legislation and rules governing the courts. Another major source of revenue earned on behalf of Government consists of the allocation to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) for the costs associated with the administration of Employment Insurance (EI) cases in the courts. Other revenues are generated by charges for photocopies of court documents and other miscellaneous revenues.

Net revenues were $4 thousand in 2012-13 ($7 thousand in 2011-12). This item consists of a small amount of respendable revenue from the sale of Crown assets.

Departmental Net Financial Position: CAS’ departmental net financial position was $542 thousand in 2012-13 (compared to ($608) thousand in 2011-12). CAS’ departmental net financial position represents the net resources (financial and non-financial) that will be used to provide future services to the courts and thereby to benefit Canadians.

Risks and Uncertainties

Funding

During 2012-13, the financial situation of CAS remained difficult and continued to be an important source of risk to the organization’s ability to fulfill its mandate.

For some years, CAS had lacked the permanent funding necessary to enable the organization to fully meet its commitments and address major program integrity issues. Budget 2011 addressed part of this need, providing CAS with approximately $3 million per year for program integrity measures. Meanwhile, however, Government cost containment measures froze appropriations, requiring departments to absorb the cost of negotiated salary increases, an important consideration given the large proportion of the CAS budget devoted to salaries.

A loan in the amount of $2,750 thousand was provided by Treasury Board in 2011-12 that enabled CAS to construct a new data centre, address IT rust-out, and consolidate corporate functions in the TDM Building. However, CAS must repay this loan over the five-year period starting in 2012-13. This represents an important annual funding pressure through 2016-17.

Funding restraints have severely limited the resources available for strategic projects needed to address critical risk areas and allow the organization to become more effective and efficient in its delivery of services to the judiciary and Canadians. CAS will continue to work with the Central Agencies to identify solutions to this longstanding problem.

Risk Management

Given the challenges of managing financial and other pressures, CAS continued to review its risk assessment and risk management capacity.

Court management is a responsibility of the judiciary and imposes requirements that are beyond CAS control. A majority of the non-salary operating expenses incurred by CAS are contracted costs for services supporting the judicial process and court hearings. These include translation, court reporters, transcripts, and security services, and are mostly driven by the number, type and duration of hearings conducted in any given year. A risk management strategy to monitor these costs and manage their fluctuation and related impacts on other key areas was reviewed and updated.

Another example where CAS made progress in developing new approaches to risk was the provision of security services for the courts and their users. This area remains a key priority, and consequently the limited resources available must be applied efficiently and effectively to anticipate and avoid security risks, as well as to deal with those that do materialize.

Likewise, maintaining an efficient and secure IM/IT infrastructure to support the operations of the courts and CAS and to protect the integrity of court information was another area where tangible progress was made in overcoming rust-out and addressing risks and problems. Much further work in this area will be needed in coming years to support the growing needs of the courts and registries.

Appendix I Acronyms

ARLU - Annual Reference Level Update

AC - Audit Committee

CA - Chief Administrator

CAS - Courts Administration Service

CRMS - Court and Registry Management System

CRP - Corporate Risk Profile

DARS - Digital Audio Recording System

DCA - Deputy Chief Administrator

DOJ - Department of Justice

ExCom - Executive Committee

GST - Goods and Services Tax

ICFR - Internal Control over Financial Reporting

IM/IT - Information Management and Information Technology

IM/RM - Information Management and Records Management

PSES - Public Service Employee Survey

SMC - Senior Management Committee

TDM - Thomas D’Arcy McGee Building

TRA - Threat and Risk Assessement

Appendix II Glossary

Term Definition
Appeal from Federal Court (Final Judgment) A proceeding instituted in the Federal Court of Appeal challenging a final judgment of the Federal Court.
Appeal from Federal Court (Interlocutory Judgment) A proceeding instituted in the Federal Court of Appeal challenging an interlocutory judgment of the Federal Court.
Application for Judicial Review A proceeding instituted challenging the decision of a federal board, commission or tribunal (section 28).
Application for review of a direction A proceeding instituted to review a direction of a military judge.
Application for review of an undertaking A proceeding instituted to review the conditions of an undertaking.
Bijural Applies to Canada’s two systems of law: the common law and the civil law.
Consolidated Different cases with the same parties or certain elements in common are heard together.
Days in Court Each court sitting day where a registrar attends in person or by teleconference.
Directions Instructions by the Court, written or oral.
Dispositions Proceedings concluded by way of judgment, discontinuance or other documents.
Files prepared for hearing and heard in Court Number of appeals, trials, judicial reviews, motions, teleconferences and meetings heard by the court.
Judgments Decisions of the court.
Not Perfected When the parties have not yet done everything required of them, according to the rules or orders of the court, in order for the case to be ready to be scheduled for a hearing.
Notice of Appeal A proceeding instituted to appeal a decision of the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada (verdict and sentence).
Notice of motion commencing an appeal A proceeding instituted for release of detention pending a decision on the appeal.
Orders Decision rendered by the courts.
Perfected When the parties have complied with the rules or orders of the Court, in order for the case to be ready to be scheduled for a hearing or disposed of by the Court.
Proceedings Instituted or Filed A matter or cause before the Court which includes appeals, actions, applications, applications for leave and for judicial review and where provided for by federal statutes, administrative proceedings such as the ones instituted by the filing of certificates, decisions or orders of federal boards, commissions or other tribunals in the registry of the Federal Courts for the purpose of enforcement.
Prothonotaries They are appointed under the Federal Courts Act (s. 12). They are full judicial officers and exercise many of the powers and functions of Federal Court judges. Their authority includes mediation, case management, practice motions (including those that may result in a final disposition of the case, regardless of the amount in issue), as well as trials of actions in which up to $50,000 is claimed (see Rules 50, 382, and 383 to 387 of the Federal Courts Rules).
Recorded Entries Entry and identification of a document in the Courts and Registry Management System.
Reserved Proceedings set aside or Decision that is not rendered immediately after a case has been heard or argued.
Scheduled for hearing Proceedings in which a hearing on the merits has been scheduled.
Specially Managed Cases A proceeding that has been assigned to a specific judge.
Stayed When a case is placed “on hold”. For example, where another related decision is to be made before the case can be continued.


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Appendix III Contact Us

National Capital Region Offices

Courtrooms and Registry Operations of the Federal Court of Appeal, Federal Court and Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada

Thomas D’Arcy McGee Building
90 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H9
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 613-996-6795
FC: 613-992-4238
Fax:
FCA/CMAC: 613-952-7226
FC (Non-Immigration):
613-952-3653
FC (Immigration):
613-947-2141
TDD: 613-995-4640

Toll free numbers
FCA: 1-800-565-0541
FC: 1-800-663-2096
CMAC: 1-800-665-3329

Registry and courtrooms of the Tax Court of Canada
Centennial Towers
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0M1
Telephone: 613-992-0901
Fax: 613-957-9034
TTY: 613-943-0946

Toll free numbers
TCC: 1-800-927-5499

Regional and Local Offices

Whitehorse, YT
Andrew A. Phillipsen Law Centre
PO Box 2703
2134 Second Avenue
Y1A 5H6
Telephone: 867-667-5441
Fax: 867-393-6212

Yellowknife, NT
The Court House
P.O. Box 1320
4905 - 49th Street
X1A 2L9
Telephone: 867-873-2044
Fax: 867-873-0291

Iqaluit, NU
Justice Building (Building #510)
P.O. Box 297
Iqaluit, Nunavut
X0A 0H0
Telephone: 867-975-6100
Fax: 867-975-6550

Vancouver, BC
Pacific Centre
P.O. Box 10065
300 - 701 West Georgia Street
V7Y 1B6
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 604-666-2055
FC: 604-666-3232
FCA/FC Fax: 604-666-8181
TCC: 604-666-7987
TCC Fax: 604-666-7967
TTY: 604-666-9228

Edmonton, AB
Scotia Place, Tower 1,
Suite 530
P.O. Box 51
10060 Jasper Avenue
T5J 3R8
Telephone: FCA/CMAC
780-495-2502
FC: 780-495-4651
TCC: 780-495-2513
Fax: 780-495-4681
TTY: 780-495-2428

Calgary, AB
635 Eighth Avenue S.W.
3rd Floor T2P 3M3 Telephone:
FCA/CMAC
403-292-5555
FC: 403-292-5920
TCC: 403-292-5556
Fax: 403-292-5329
TTY: 403-292-5879

Regina, SK
The Court House
2425 Victoria Avenue
S4P 3V7
Telephone: 306-780-5268
Fax: 306-787-7217

Saskatoon, SK
The Court House
520 Spadina Crescent East
S7K 2H6
Telephone: 306-975-4509
Fax: 306-957-4818

Winnipeg, MB
363 Broadway
4th floor
R3C 3N9
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 204-983-2232
FC: 204-983-2509
TCC: 204-983-1785
Fax: 204-983-7636
TTY: 204-984-4440

Toronto, ON
180 Queen Street 2nd floor
M5V 3L6
Telephone:
FCA/FC/CMAC:
416-952-8006 / 416-973-3356 / 416-954-9823
TCC: 416 973-9181 or
1-800-927-5499
Fax:
FCA/FC/CMAC:
416-954-5068
TCC: 416-973-5944
TTY
FCA/FC/TCC:
416 954-4245

London, ON *
231 Dundas Street
3rd floor
N6A 1H1
Telephone: 1-800-927-5499
FAX: 519-675-3391
* Court room facility only.

Montréal, QC
30 McGill Street
H2Y 3Z7
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 514-283-5200
FC: 514-283-4820
TCC: 514-283-9912
Fax: FCA/CMAC/FC
514-283-6004
TCC: 514-496-1996
TTY: 514-283-3017

Québec, QC
Palais de Justice
Room 500A, 300 Jean Lesage Blvd.
G1K 8K6
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 418-648-4964
FC: 418-648-4920
TCC: 418-648-7324
Fax: 418-648-4051
TTY: 418-648-4644

Fredericton, NB
82 Westmorland Street
Room 100
E3B 3L3
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC: 506-452-2036
FC: 506-452-3016
TCC: 506-452-2424
Fax: 506-452-3584
TTY: 506-452-3036

Saint John, NB
110 Charlotte Street
Room 413
E2L 2J4
Telephone: 506-636-4990
Fax: 506-658-3070

Halifax’ NS
1801 Hollis Street
Room 1720
B3J 3N4
Telephone:
FCA/CMAC:
902-426-5326
FC: 902-426-3282
TCC: 902-426-5372
Fax: 902-426-5514
TTY: 902-426-9776

Charlottetown’ PE
Sir Henry Louis Davies Law Courts
P.O. Box 2000,
42 Water Street
C1A 8B9
Telephone: 902-368-0179
Fax: 902-368-0266

St. John’s’ NL
The Court House
309 Duckworth Street
A1C 5M3
Telephone: 709-772-2884
Fax: 709-772-6351